Tom's blog

Some wines should just take a rest

After spending a delightful breakfast with Dan Cohn talking about his accessible and reasonably priced cabernet sauvignon, I had quite the opposite experience speaking to Craig Becker, winemaker at Priest Ranch.

Becker has an envious selection of mountain-grown grapes on Vaca Mountain just south of St. Helena. Generally, vineyards located on mountain sides produce late-ripening grapes that in turn create massive wines with serious tannins and depth.

Indeed, these red wines are hardly approachable. Only the regular 2015 Priest Ranch Cabernet Sauvignon was drinkable. The estate’s Coach Blend, a Bordeaux-like blend, the Somerston Merlot and the Somerston Cabernet Sauvignon XCVI were closed, tannic and begging to be decanted or, better, aged.

Don’t get me wrong: these wines were great but far too early to enjoy. And that got me to thinking about the number of people who pay hundreds of dollars in restaurants to taste these wines. Even against a steak, I don’t see how they could be enjoyed.

Priest Ranch is now part of the Somerston Estate as a result of a purchase recently made to expand its vineyards. It is named after James Joshua Priest who settled the property in 1869. It was purchased by the Chapmans in 2004. All of its wines come from estate-grown grapes.

Perhaps the best wine of the tasting was the Priest Ranch Grenache Blanc 2016 ($20). Becker says the yield from this block is 20 tons an acre — but they drop 14 tons to get the results they want.